The Importance of Dry Skin Brushing

When I first saw a Naturopath in 1997, one of the tasks suggested was skin brushing. Although my ND only recommended I use circular movements in various areas (outer thigh, chest, oblique area), others swear by a more thorough dry skin brushing.  If you are tight for time, just focus on the areas I just mentioned; if not, then follow the guidelines below, which are from the book Making Sense of Women’s Health, by Dr. Marita Schauch.

Dry Skin Brushing

As the largest organ in the body, the skin plays a huge role in detoxification and illumination. Dry skin brushing helps to keep the pores in your skin open unless encourages the illumination of toxins and other metabolic waste products. Dry skin brushing also improves the surface circulation of blood and lymph. This results in a stronger immune system and increased ability to bring much needed oxygen and other nutrients to the skin.

The overall benefits of dry skin brushing include, but are not limited to:

  • Improved circulation and healing
  • Increased cell renewal
  • Stronger immune system
  • Removal of dead skin cells
  • Improved detoxification

Required items

Unnatural, not synthetic, bristle brush or loofah. It is preferable to use one with the long handle so that you can access hard to reach areas.

Method

It’s best to do your skin brushing on dry skin before showering or bathing so that you can then wash off any dead skin cells.

Using circular counter-clockwise strokes, begin on the soles of your feet and move up around the ankles, calves, size, buttocks, abdomen, breasts/chest and back. Then proceed to the palms of the hands around the wrists and up the arms and shoulders. You should always be brushing toward the heart.

The brush should not scratch but you should feel some friction against your skin.

Wash your brush and soap and water every two weeks to remove any accumulated debris.

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